Winsome Wednesday

I believe the state of confusion has taken over our country. We still have no results. Some folks stayed up late, and tried to follow the babblings of the “if this happens, that will happen” of the Election Night anchors. I miss Tim Russert with his white erasable board. That was awesome. He gave details, but no opinions on air. I liked that so much.

Today is a day to concentrate on writing. I have a scheduled ZOOM session tomorrow morning, and I’m eager to hear her feedback. Just need to keep plugging away, while achieving 50K words this year. Last year, I had a giveaway for NaNoWriMo. For every time you commented on my blog, I entered an entry in your name. My friend Judy Erb had the most entries. My friend Pat Riedmann won, donating her $50 to any kids’ program for writing. Trouble is, with COVID a local summer adventure for kids who want to write is facing delay until another time. I will find a worthy program and donate soon.

Are you interested in another giveaway? Let me know in the comments just below today’s blog. I’m guessing there may be interest, just want to learn how much. Thank you!

Photo by Jill Wellington on Pexels.com

Today’s pleasant weather is a gift from the heavens above. It’s chilly at the present moment, but I’m certain it will improve by noon. It’s a day we’ll think back on when we have snow and ice later. I’m kind of ready to hunker down and hibernate. Is that a bad thing? People may grouse (word of the day – GROUSE) about it. In the long run, it’s up to us how we weather any season.

A season can be an election, a hot summer, an icy winter. Our attitudes are something we can do by acting, not reacting. When you’re grumpy and negative, you invite those thoughts into your mind and they fester. They multiply faster than aggressive cancer. The disease spreads from the brain to the heart, making it hard and cold. Our creation was about being grateful, with a friendly attitude, and being happy. Look at a child. They laugh over three hundred times a day. How much do we?

One of the many things Dad taught us was to accept what’s going on. You can’t change some things. That is how life works. “You might as well make the best of it.” He would often say, “It’s not the worst that can happen.” Ah, there’s that gratitude thing again. Your mental health will thank you. Your body will thank you. I know so many people who get extreme anxiety when they can’t control everything.

I think Mom’s gets worse the older she becomes. Some reasons are her near deafness, blindness, and instability on her feet. While those things are hard to deal with, it would help if she could relax herself. She wouldn’t become so irritated with store clerks. When I take her, I get the clerk’s attention and tell them, “Mom has very low vision and hearing. Please speak slowly and a little louder.” It goes better after that. It would help a great deal if she would admit she really could get around better with a walker.

She refuses. “I’m not that bad yet.”

I beg your pardon, Mom. You are. It would reduce your anxiety. It would help you be less uncertain, less wobbly on your feet. Ultimately, it is her decision. It would take so little to admit you need a device. Being human, it’s a matter of pride. We all suffer from it. Some more than others.

It’s strange, in seeing Mom aging, she reminds me of her Grandma Bobell. Her father’s mother. She was a very tall lady (from my little kid vantage point) and she was always nice to us. She lived in an apartment as long as I can remember. I’m not sure how old she was when she died. She outlived her only child, which was a shame. I can’t imagine how she felt. Mom has some of her mannerisms, too. The way she wrings her hands when she’s talking, the way she gets up from a chair, the way she shows her indignation at a comment. She straightens her back up and almost makes a “sniffing” noise, and gets indignant. Watch out. I warned you!

Whatever you do today, be kind to everyone you encounter. We’ve all been through an experience this whole year. We’re uncertain who our next leader really will be. We may experience diminishing senses. We may be afraid. We may be too proud to admit it. A little kindness goes a very long way in helping your fellow citizens adjust to the next thing than happens. Be Safe, and we’ll see each other again tomorrow. Get outside for some fresh air. It’ll do everyone good.

Puppy Training Class

What a fun Saturday morning! We enrolled Goldie in puppy class and it was a big day for her. The breeder already socialized her quite well, she spent time with some busy teenage girls, other puppies, all sorts of different stimuli. When we got her three weeks ago, she could already sit. She had never had a collar on, walked on a leash, or been in a kennel. She did all three within the first four hours of coming home, and sleeps pretty much through the night.

I cannot imagine a more fun job than working with puppies. Similar to a baby exploring their world, puppies explore even more thoroughly by sniffing every square inch over and over again. Don’t get me wrong, I’m not saying they’re the same. There are similarities. And yes, babies can think, they have a soul, they are not animals but mammals, but for this discussion, it’s sort of similar.

Yes, I’m glad people don’t greet other people like dogs do, that would be quite uncomfortable. Of the four pups present, they were all younger than the one who was afraid to play with the others. She was beyond the socialization window they say puppies have – fourteen weeks, then they are not as apt to socialize. I can’t imagine only having fourteen weeks when it’s takes some people a lifetime to comfortably meet, greet, talk, and socialize with others. People seem to change over the lifetime. If you can introduce loud noises into the puppy’s life and they seem to tolerate them, they may not end up afraid of fireworks. That would be a plus. I’m hoping a Goldie, the purebred lab won’t be afraid of them.

Learning the trick behind getting them to sit, down. Interesting!

The puppies really seemed to enjoy the play time afterward. It was fun to watch them all running and playing. I would have thought Goldie would have been tired after all of that activity but she was a live wire this afternoon. I’m afraid there will be more of those days than quiet days ahead.

I have had a dog since 1982. I got one for my kids after their dad left. They were great at taking care of her, and Shadow, a mixed mutt purchased for $15, lived for sixteen and a half years. She lived until Dan and I got married. Once she was no longer with us, Dan decided Becky and I were too lonely without a dog. We adopted Mocho, a brownish/black lab mix, from the Humane Society. She was a good girl. Her kennel was in the basement next to Becky’s bedroom, so Becky let Mocho sleep with her every night so she didn’t have to hear her whimper. Wow.

When I went on disability in 2000, Mocho was two years old and a good company for me being home all the time. Dan thought I needed my own dog, so we got Mollie, a Shepard/Lab mix, also from the Humane Society. She was a timid dog, but she was totally house trained by Mocho. Every time one went out, the other one did too. It was unbelievably easy. They both left us together, in 2014 I believe. Mocho had severe hip dysplasia, and Mollie had congestive heart failure. Poor things! We were never going to have dogs again, wanted more freedom, blah, blah, blah.

Fast forward to after Dan retired, I was really lonely for another dog. After over thirty years of having one, it just didn’t seem right to not have one. And then we adopted two, who were four weeks and just taken from their Mom. Mom was ill, the pups were three and a half and four pounds, and so beautiful. They had sky blue eyes. Mix of Lab/Bassett. What???? People do a double take when they’re told about that. Love is indeed strange.

So these two crazies crept their way into our hearts. They were a real challenge, too. We didn’t know Dan would become quite ill with a mosquito bourne illness like West Nile. He had Chikengunya. It was terrible and lasted several months. While this was waning, he was developing some more severe fatigue and generally feeling terrible. He had some pretty big symptoms of heart issues, did not have a heart attack, but had a quadruple bypass. By then, the pups were six months old. They were still into everything and misbehaving. They eventually got better, but it feels like we had them longer than the six and a half years we have.

When Roxie was hit by a car in July, we were devastated. Lexie missed her sister terribly. By September or early October, Dan decided Lexie needed a friend. So here we are again, with a puppy. This is not for two retired people in their late sixties. Well, it is now. Lots of work, but we will hopefully have a great companion when one of us is left without the other. It’ll be good to learn how to make Goldie into a good pet while we learn how to be better pet parents.

Lexie is doing better every day with this pesky puppy in the house. She is starting to play quite a bit in the yard with Goldie, and yesterday, Lexie was laying in the sun on the ground, and Goldie came up, laid down by her and started cleaning her ears. Lexie didn’t mind a bit. Roxie and her used to do it all the time.

So it’s been a good day again. I’m not overwhelmed by everything like I was yesterday. Things are not so out of control as they seemed.

Leave a comment and like this post, you’ll get your name entered in the drawing I’m doing on December 1 at NOON. It’s open to everyone who comments and/or likes a post. Comment below here, and you’ll be entered. Come back every day, like, and comment. Are you a dog person or a cat person?? If dog, how many have you owned in your life?? How many owned you?? Which one was most special?? I won’t tell the others.

Come back tomorrow for another blog. I hope you have a good evening. Thank you so much for reading tonight.